50mm VS 75-300mm + Photo Catch Up

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Photo taken using kit lens.

 

I think it’s time for another experiment post. Today I will be photographing a few subjects switching between two canon lenses: f/1.8 50mm, and the f/3.5 75-300mm.

This will be fun 😉 . Firstly, I am going to show the big lens at it’s most common focal lengths at the aperture f/4.5. Then I will use the 50mm at the same aperture. After that I will show a photo of the 50mm using f/1.8.

The second part of the post will be some photos I took recently on both lenses. 🙂

 

50mm & 75-300mm~ mason jar

Click on any of the images in the thumbnail grid to view my basic camera settings.

This grids images are the 75-300mm lens’s photos at it’s different major focal lengths. 😀

 

The first image is my 50mm lens’s photo of the mason jar at f/4.5. The second is the 50mm at f/1.8.

 

 

50mm & 75-300mm~ zinnia

This is the shots from the 75-300mm (I was wrong about staying at an aperture of 4.0. I actually changed it a little more to maintain proper exposure while zooming in ^^’ . 😉

Once again the 50mm was set at 4.5 and 1.8. If you click on them you’ll be able to tell which is which.

 

 

50mm & 75-300mm~car

 

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50mm f/4.5
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50mm f/1.8

 

 

Catch Up Photos

 

important announcement! As of today I am almost out of storage space! I will probably not be posting here for a little while after today. I will explain in another post what this means more fully. 

 

Emmaline Lucille (1)

Kit Lens Experiment + Limiting Myself

Hello friends!

Today I was determined to stretch my photographic muscles so I went out to our yard equipped only with my kit lens

The truth of the matter is this: I almost NEVER want to use my kit lens now that I have my 50mm 1.8.

 

Your kit lens is an old friend

My kit lens is the lens I first had. I couldn’t afford to buy another. It was the lens I chose to use even over the zoom lens that came along in the pack. One thing I was always frustrated with my kit lens over…was it’s adamant refusal to go above f/4.0 almost all the time. The smallest # I was gonna’ get—was f/3.5. And that only showed up on manual mode in rare conditions. So the blurring of my backgrounds in portraits was mediocre at best. But with some practice you tend to learn a few things. I was determined to use those tricks in today’s nature walk and really get my creative juices going with my kit lens.

  1. I made new discoveries with my kit lens.
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I still can mostly only use my kit lens for self portraits. My 50mm is too close to my face for comfortable self portraits. Ignore my angry eyes. 😉

2. I learned to accept limitations and overcome them, even in portraits.

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I still love this picture even today. The sad thing is that this photo was before I knew how to use manual mode (I took this on day 3 of getting my dslr) so I cheated with it and used CA (creative auto). 😥

But the point is limiting yourself can be one of the greatest ways to overcome obstacles and get better.

 

Limiting myself with my old lens

So out I went with just my kit lens for two reasons:

  1. I want to get better.
  2. Limiting myself teaches me patience and creativity.

If you’re still stuck with your kit lens…appreciate it! It’s tough when you see friends of yours or other people with nicer lenses (who get that lovely bokeh so easily, while you have to work hard to get it!) and cameras. I remember always looking enviously at close friends who had nice cameras and wondering if my turn to get one would ever come. Sometimes God opens doors when we least expect then. So don’t worry. Save up to buy that lens (or camera)– but in the meantime work hard to get that bokeh, work your hardest to get a shallow depth of field in your portraits. It’s possible. Just difficult. But when you practice it can become much easier. (I’m still practicing–haven’t hit ‘perfection’ yet 😉 )

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Strangely this butterfly was the first thing I saw. I couldn’t believe how close he let me get when I stayed still.

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Negative space, framing, and a pop of red against neutrals. Makes me happy.

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A bokeh manual focus GIF.

I was very surprised and pleased at the pictures I ended up getting. :blush:

 

Old limitations…what’s next?

I have something of a history with limitations. First, the fact that I had no camera. Then the fact I used my sister’s (not-so-great) point-and-shoot. Then the fact I (finally!) got my Canon Eos Rebel t6. Then I only had my kit lens. And then last year sometime a dear friend gave me my 50mm. THAT was a wonderful day. Everything has just been going to new levels since then.

One super neat thing–because I have been learning new things every day with my camera…now when I pick up my kit lens it’s not quite as hard to get pleasing images. As the photographer, it’s up to you to make your images great. Don’t just rely on your camera to automatically know how to be a good photographer. Your camera (lens, etc) isn’t the photographer. You are!

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Anyone remember this photo? It’s probably my favorite photo I’ve ever taken on my point-and-shoot. The focus is all wrong (the background’s in focus) but I can see a story here. I like that it’s almost sepia (coppery tones) and I like my composition. Whatever camera/lens you have—you can always get better with it with practice.

So, now what?

I have a plan for the next four years of my photography. It’s not a complete plan—but it is a purchasing plan.

I have decided on the next two lenses that I will buy.

They are…

Left: The canon 85mm f/1.8 prime lens!     Right: The ef-s canon 35mmf/2.8 macro IS-STM (prime)

 

Aren’t they gorgeous? They both run in the somewhere below $400 range which isn’t the $1,000 range…so I’m happy. But this will still take 2-3 years of saving I’m guessing. I’ve wanted a macro lens for a while and this one looks like the perfect fit for me. It even has an lcd light to help me see close up. It has a clear focusing rate of 5.16 inches (means I can get that close to the subject!!) which sounds amazing to me. The 85mm looks like an amazing addition to the portrait side of things and a great idea to expand for my future business (next 2-4 years, DV.). I want to possibly get into more newborn photography and I’v always wanted to take close-up macro shots of things like baby toes, fingers, engagement rings, etc. I can’t wait. But basically I’m going to set up a budget and hopefully get a job to go toward investing in my photography business.

Who knows what the future will bring? But this girl’s looking forward to seeing what it brings for sure! *thumbs up

 

Emmaline Lucille (1)

In what ways are you limited as a photographer?

Do you have any tips/experiences you’d like to share?

What are your goals for the future on the photography side of things?

Crushing on any lenses? (drooling, dreaming, etc. 😀 ) 

 

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P.S USING AN OLD LENS OR LIMITING YOURSELF BY TAKING ONLY HORIZONTAL/VERTICAL SHOTS FOR A DAY IS A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHY EXERCISE. LOOK FOR CREATIVE WAYS TO LIMIT YOURSELF.